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The New Wilderness (Idle Words):

This requires us to talk about a different kind of privacy, one that we haven’t needed to give a name to before. For the purposes of this essay, I’ll call it ‘ambient privacy’—the understanding that there is value in having our everyday interactions with one another remain outside the reach of monitoring, and that the small details of our daily lives should pass by unremembered. What we do at home, work, church, school, or in our leisure time does not belong in a permanent record. Not every conversation needs to be a deposition.

Until recently, ambient privacy was a simple fact of life. Recording something for posterity required making special arrangements, and most of our shared experience of the past was filtered through the attenuating haze of human memory. Even police states like East Germany, where one in seven citizens was an informer, were not able to keep tabs on their entire population. Today computers have given us that power. Authoritarian states like China and Saudi Arabia are using this newfound capacity as a tool of social control. Here in the United States, we’re using it to show ads. But the infrastructure of total surveillance is everywhere the same, and everywhere being deployed at scale.

 

Via Kai Brach’s email newsletter Dense Discovery – this essay has caused me to think a lot about privacy and how we consider it, talk about it, assume it works, understand it and communicate about it with the same set of assumptions. A very good read, written by Maciej Ceg?owski.

I’m sorry, but as a runner I cannot cut the legs from another animal – By Chris Dombrowski

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It’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything – here’s the mighty Willamette River in flood stage after several days of hard rain, something rare for our area. The dams upriver needed some relief and expansive clay soils get saturated so you end up with this. This is near campus, from the river that leads you to the ball stadiums and Pre’s Trail (the most famous of the running trails we have here) . . I hope to update this more regularly once again. We’ll see. Hope Spring is treating folks well –

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Well, this year has been quite a year for me in terms of my running. I started 2018 coming off of rehabbing a broken ankle, setting a goal of running 1000 miles and competing in a few races. In many ways I far exceeded my modest goals and in other ways I didn’t. All in all it was a positive year for me. The breakdown:

  • 901 miles run. My goal was 1000 miles, but a broken elbow late this year slowed me down a bit. 
  • Completed my 12th Half Marathon
  • Ran an under 2 hour half marathon
  • Ran my first 30k Trail Run
  • Ran an 18 Mile Trail Run
  • Found a running group (or rather they found me?). Either way this has been the singular most positive aspect of this year in terms of running. The folks in this group are people I now call friends as we have connected on much more than our mile splits and tight hamstrings.

Goals for 2019 so far include:

  • Run 1000 miles
  • Run a 50k Trail Run
  • Possibly (finally) run a marathon
  • Begin more cross-training activities (Yoga and modest weight training)
  • Volunteer to officiate at local & state track and field events (I’m currently on the Oregon Track Club’s discus crew)
  • Learn more about what makes me be a successful distance runner honing my nutrition and hydration needs along with other aspects.

Books on running that I read this past year:

Onwards into 2019!