my personal site

This winter and spring I’ve had the opportunity to connect with others in the act of running. On Sundays I’ve been attending the TrackTown Fitness event at famous Hayward Field here in Eugene. At this event, they split people into three groups: runners, run-walkers, and walkers. Each week they have a specific workout and also bring in a specialist of some kind. One week it was a cardiologist, another week it was a nutritionist. The dynamic of running in a group is hard to explain – it’s not the same as running in an actual race, but there’s a connection with others who are out there for a variety of reasons. I’ve been able to meet some very nice people this way by attending these running workout sessions.

The other group that I was invited to join is the UO Noon Runners Group, which apparently has been going on for some 30 years. This group meets every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at noon and does a variety of routes around the campus area. I was invited by another campus IT professional, Cleven. I’ve known Cleven on and off via our work worlds for awhile now and we often would talk running whenever we saw each other. He is the most positive runner and one of the most friendly people I’ve ever met. Each run he always greets other people with a warm, “Good morning!” and a smile. I’ve noticed, too, that he runs freely, sometimes pushing the pace and other times slowing down to let the slower runners catch up. It’s always a good workout and a nice way to break up the day. I’m extremely grateful to have been invited (which happened on a whim – I was heading over to do my own run when Cleven saw me and invited me along).

Running is often a solo activity for me – a meditation of sorts and a time to focus on my breath, let my mind wander and clear it out. It gives my body a chance to de-stress and ultimately relax. Running with others has added a completely new dimension to this and so far I’m very content.

I went back to see my PT yesterday for a check-up on my ankle (which I broke last May). The ankle is doing well overall and he did a “gait analysis” on my running form while I was there. I’ve got some work to do on my form which will help with my pace as well as how I feel during and after my runs. I know that body work people have known this for a long time, but I feel as if this is a whole new discovery for me as I learn about how my body moves in space. There are default movements that I’ve done for years that are not optimal and will take work to change, but I’m certainly up for it.

Onwards – 

This snap was taken by one of my student employees on his recent climb of Oregon’s tallest peak, Mt. Hood, at 11,250 ft (3,429 Metres). Lovely view of a sunset shadow.


This is a video in which Mr. Kipchoge talks about his upbringing in Kenya and his attempt to break the two hour barrier in the marathon, which he almost did last May. It’s worth watching I think (turn on Close Captioning, but listen too, as his accent makes some of the captions that are produced inaccurate).

Three important items from his talk:

1. Stick to your priorities

2. No excuses

3. Learn to say “No.”

Finally, he argues that discipline is like a muscle – the more it gets put into use, the stronger it becomes.